Classroom Management Tip: How To Get Immediate Attention

photo by: smartclassroommanagement.com

So what exactly is a teacher to do in a room full of distracted children? That’s the question that I’m sure every teacher has asked themselves at least once.  An important classroom management tip involves how to get the immediate attention of your students.  The ability to request and get your students’ attention is vital to your classroom management.

How do you get your student’s attention?

Getting just one student’s attention can prove to be a challenge, but getting the attention of all the students in your classroom can be almost impossible without the right classroom management strategy.  Its importance cannot be stressed enough because it saves valuable time as well as increases listening skills and class performance.

Luckily, there are a few things a teacher can do to get their children’s attention right back where it should be.  Top on the list is to give an explanation with details as to why you’re asking them to give you their full attention.   This will help encourage them to comply with your expectations and be self-motivated in doing so.

Secondly, find some kind of sign or hand gesture that students can recognize as an indication that they really need to pay closer attention.  Watch out for letting students have too much time to pay attention and to follow through.

One giant misstep teachers are likely to do is to permit more time than students actually need to comply.  This could end up working against the teacher.  Encourage and even model to your students how to immediately respond with undivided attention. Immediate response has a direct correlation to respect and manners as well as pursuing excellence in life.

You will need to repeat often, so try to make it fun and practice as often as you can.  Nailing down this one piece of classroom management is very important because it makes everything else flow much more easily and affects many areas of learning.

Read the original article here:
How To Ask For And Receive Your Students’ Attention Within Two Seconds